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February 01, 2011

Mark Wielaard: New GPG key. Finally created a new GPG key using gnupg. The old one was a DSA/1024 bits one and 8 years old. The new one is a RSA/2048 bits one. I will use the new one in the future to sign any release tarballs I might create. pub 2048R/57816A6A 2011-01-29 Key f...

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February 01, 2011

Andrew Hughes: [SECURITY] IcedTea6 1.7.8, 1.8.5, 1.9.5 Released!. We are pleased to announce a new set of security releases, IcedTea6 1.7.8, IcedTea6 1.8.5 and IcedTea6 1.9.5. This update contains the following security updates: The IcedTea project provides a harness to build the source code from OpenJDK6 u...

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home > news > developers > how to write a memory leak unit test

How to Write a Memory Leak Unit Test

Unit tests are great for ensuring that your functionality is correct. But how do you make sure you don't have leaks in your code, leaks that eventually cause your application to crash when it runs out of memory? Unit tests don't typically don't run into memory problems directly because they tend to start up, run a little bit of code, and shut down -- getting a nice fresh memory environment on each test start. One great way to help protect yourself from uptime problems is to write leak tests. These are unit tests where you first perform some operations, then do normal cleanup, and finally you assert that the objects you were using during the operation have been cleaned up completely. In other words, that there are no references left anywhere on the heap. Testing for leaks isn't very hard; the basic trick is to create a weak reference to your to-be-cleaned object (by constructing a WeakReference wrapping your object), then you delete all your local references to the object, then you perform garbage collection, and finally you see whether the weak reference still contains your object. This works because the weak reference is handled specially by the garbage collection system. It turns out things aren't quite as easy as that, because garbage collectors try to be smart, and simply calling System.gc() doesn't mean it's going to actually perform a complete and final garbage collection. This means that your unit test could incorrec...


Date: April, 01 2010
Url: http://blogs.sun.com/tor/entry/leak_unit_tests


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